JAPAN’S FISH CATCH COULD BE ZERO TONNES BY 2050.

According to data revealed by Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, catches in commercial fisheries in 2023 were around 3.7 million tonnes, which represents a drop of 4.3% compared to catches in 2022 and is also the third consecutive year of declines. Today’s pequera catch is only 30% of what it was four decades ago, in 1984, when fishing was at its peak.

Scientists from the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology indicate that Japan’s fish catch is declining at a rate that, if it continues, will reach almost zero by 2050.

Unfortunately, this situation is playing out in many parts of the world as natural fisheries reach their maximum sustained catch at the same time as demand increases.

Information like this is what reaffirms and reminds us more and more of the importance of aquaculture as a tool for food security and conservation of natural fish and shellfish populations.

The solution is not to build more boats or expand fishing areas, but to establish public policies and support programs that are forceful and promote research, innovation and development of world aquaculture in all its forms.

Source:https://lnkd.in/eqeVQmrg